May 10, 2024
Things to know before cataract surgery

The majority of people suffer from cataract, which manifests as an opaque or clouded lens in either one or both eyes. Fortunately, there is a less invasive eye cataract operation that can reverse cataracts and the resulting sight loss.

The lens is translucent and flexible when you are born, directing lights onto the retina located at the rear of the eye. A distinct view is produced by this focus. However, as we age, proteins in our lenses clump together and impair our vision, making it harder to discern details. An eye cataract operation is the solution for that.

It is natural to have post-procedure doubts and say there are so many things I wish I knew before cataract surgery. Despite its safety and high success rate, anxiety in patients undergoing cataract surgery is very common. Anxiety associated with cataract surgery is one of the main reasons candidates for cataract surgery delay surgery. At Skipper Eye-Q Super Speciality Eye Hospital, we encourage our patients not to let the fear and anxiety of surgery increase worry.

This post will go over twenty facts that you should know before having cataract surgery to help you feel more at ease and less nervous.

20 Things I Wish I Knew Before Cataract Surgery

  1. It’s Very Common: Among the safest and most common surgical procedures carried out globally is cataract surgery. Every year, millions of patients get this operation to help them see again.
  2. The Secret is to Prepare: To evaluate the best plan of action and identify the extent of your cataracts, your eye specialist will do a thorough examination of your eyes before the operation. In addition, they will give you advice on how to be ready for the operation, such as what drugs to avoid taking and when to cut back on food and liquids.
  3. Surgery Types: There are several forms of cataract surgery, such as laser-assisted surgeries and conventional phacoemulsification. Based on your specific requirements and the state of your eyes, your doctor will advise you on the best eye cataract operation.
  4. Options for anaesthesia: Local anaesthesia is usually used during cataract surgery, so although you will be awake, your eye is under anaesthesia to minimise any discomfort.
  5. Fast Process: Most patients can go back home the same day after the procedure, which typically takes 15 to 30 minutes for each eye.
  6. Eyesight Improvement: Post cataract surgery, most patients report a noticeable improvement in their eyesight. To attain the best possible visual acuity, you might need to wear eyeglasses or contact lenses while waiting for your eyes to fully adapt.
  7. No Pain: You shouldn’t experience any pain throughout the procedure; instead, you should just feel a little pressure or motion in your eye. Tell your surgeon right away if you feel any discomfort.
  8. Recovery Time: Although the procedure is brief, recuperating from cataract surgery might take a few weeks. In the days after surgery, you can have light sensitivity, hazy vision, and minor pain.
  9. Complications: Infection and haemorrhage are two concerns associated with cataract surgery, just like with any surgical operation. Serious cataract operation risks are uncommon, though, and surgery’s advantages frequently exceed its drawbacks.
  10. Lifestyle Adjustments: Post cataract surgery, you might need to make some adjustments to your way of life, such as avoiding physically demanding tasks and wearing sunglasses outside to shield your eyes from UV rays. You must adhere to your doctor’s advice to get the greatest possible result.
  11. Types of Cataract Lenses: Toric, multifocal, and mono-focal intraocular lenses (IOLs) are among the several types of cataract lenses that can be used during surgery. Talk with your surgeon to find the best solution for your requirements and lifestyle since each kind has its benefits and considerations.
  12. Potential Risks: Although cataract surgery is usually safe, there are always certain associated cataract operation risks. These might include inflammation, detachment of the retina, and oedema. Before the treatment, your surgeon will go over these risks with you and take precautions to reduce them.
  13. After Effects: You can have minor pain, glare, halos around lights, and impaired vision as a transient cataract operation after effects following surgery. As your eyes heal, these sensations usually get better in a couple of days to weeks.
  14. Visual Recovery: Your eyes may need some time to properly adjust to the cataract surgery, even though many people report considerable improvements in their vision quickly after the procedure. Over a few weeks or months, while your eyes recover and adjust to the new implanted lens, your vision can keep progressively improving.
  15. Driving Restrictions: Until your eyesight has stabilised and your surgeon gives the all-clear to resume driving, you must refrain from driving right after cataract surgery.
  16. Follow-Up Care: To track your healing post cataract surgery and guarantee the best possible visual results, you will need to schedule routine follow-up visits with your surgeon. To encourage recovery and avoid problems, make sure you adhere to all post-operative care recommendations given by your surgeon.
  17. Activity to Avoid: To lower the cataract operation risks of elevated intraocular pressure or dislodging the intraocular lens, it is imperative to avoid vigorous activity, heavy lifting, and bending over in the days after cataract surgery.
  18. Long-Term Prospects: Cataract surgery has a very high patient satisfaction rate and is a very successful technique. Post cataract surgery, the majority of patients have greater vision and a longer-lasting quality of life.
  19. Cost considerations: Although health insurance frequently covers cataract surgery, it’s important to check with your physician to find out what your coverage entails and how much you’ll pay out of cash.
  20. Emotional Support: Before having cataract surgery, it’s common to have anxiety or nervousness. Don’t be afraid to ask for emotional assistance and comfort at this time from relatives, close friends, or support groups.

Hope after reading these knowledgeable facts by our experts you’re not still wondering about things I wish I knew before cataract surgery. At Skipper Eye-Q Super Speciality Eye Hospital, we strive to improve the quality of life for our patients by using cutting-edge eye cataract operation and vision correction techniques. People of all ages can benefit from modern vision correction procedures performed by our team of skilled ophthalmologists. You may quickly go to clear vision by contacting our office to schedule your thorough eye exam and consultation.

Share it:
Our Doctors
Testimonials

Oluremi Ashaolu

Hello everyone at skipper Eye q Skipper eye q is a place to be, they’re so kind and understanding especially the receptionist she was so helpful when I came for my son’s test and operation, God bless you all

Rossy Jolaoluwa

Great hospital my surgery was successful I have been discharged. All thanks to skipper and My lovely and beautiful Dr Okunade. I’m really happy

Joy Makanjuola

I did my surgery last year at the ilupeju branch, at first I was scared at first but after the surgery I didn’t regret it. Thank you Dr Okunade,very excellent Doctor.

April 26, 2024
Training Eyes After Cataract Surgery

Have you had cataract removal surgery done recently, or are you thinking about having one? At Skipper Eye-Q Super Specialty Eye Hospital, our eye doctors offer excellent advice to hasten the healing of your eyes. Depending on your circumstances and how well you follow surgical instructions, recovery might take up to two months. Getting your eyes used to doing regular chores is one of the simplest strategies for dealing with your vision imbalance.

You may be confident that cataract surgery is both safe and very successful, particularly if you visit a reputable eye hospital like Skipper Eye-Q Super Speciality Eye Hospital. Still, how long does it take to heal from cataract surgery depends on the postoperative work.

Training your eyes after cataract surgery might help you heal faster. Our team of cataract surgeons has compiled important material, which includes activities to help your eyes get used to the replacement lens implants.

Cataract Surgery

A cataract treatment is a correction of vision using laser surgery that involves the removal of your native eye lens and replacement with an artificial one. Your eye surgeon will assist you in determining which of the many lenses available will best meet your visual objectives.

You may leave the outpatient procedure a few hours later, with each eye taking fifteen to twenty minutes to operate on. After the surgery, our team will keep an eye on your recovery, respond to any concerns you might have, and give you thorough instructions on how to take care of yourself thereafter.

15 Tips On Training Eyes After Cataract Surgery

Adhering to the recommended postoperative protocols will determine, in part, excellent outcomes and how long does it take to heal from cataract surgery. To achieve the greatest outcomes and a pleasing visual effect, do the tasks listed below. You can return to your regular activities more quickly by using your surroundings as a training ground (without glasses or contacts!).

These are the 15 tips for training your eyes after cataract surgery:

  • Observe post-operative instructions: Pay close attention to your doctor’s advice and make sure you follow all post-operative instructions properly.
  • Apply prescription eye drops: To aid in healing and avoid infection use prescribed eye drops as directed.
  • Rest your eyes: Particularly in the first few days following surgery, give your eyes a break and try not to strain them too much.
  • Put on safety glasses or shades: To protect your eyes from dust and bright lights when you’re outside.
  • Do not rub your eyes: To avoid causing discomfort or harm, do not touch or rub your eyes.
  • Practice good hygiene: Keep your eyes clean and stay out of unclean areas to lower your risk of illness.
  • Keep planned follow-up visits: Keep all of your follow-up appointments with your eye doctor to ensure that you receive routine examinations and evaluations.
  • Resuming regular activities gradually: As directed by your physician, begin with mild activities and work your way back.
  • Practice mild exercises: To increase your flexibility and strength, undertake the mild eye exercises that your doctor has prescribed.
  • Use an eye shield at night: Screen your eyes at night to avoid pressure or unintentional rubbing as you sleep.
  • Hydrate Well: Keep your body and eyes moisturized by drinking lots of water; this will speed up the healing process.
  • Reduce screen time: To lessen eye strain and encourage relaxation, spend as little time as possible in front of electronic screens.
  • Avoid physically demanding activities: Steer clear of physically demanding tasks or tasks such as lifting that might strain your eyes.
  • Maintain a nutritious diet: To promote general eye health and healing, eat a balanced diet high in vitamins and minerals.
  • Be patient: Recognise that healing takes time, and allow your eyes to acclimatize to the post-surgery changes.

Following a cataract treatment surgery, you may enhance your eyesight and promote a speedy recovery by adhering to your post-operative care regimen and these guidelines. During your recuperation, don’t forget to contact your eye doctor with any queries or if you encounter any strange symptoms.

The Need For Training Eyes After Cataract Surgery

It will be simpler to do the exercise by yourself now that you are aware of a few techniques for training your eyes after cataract surgery. Recall that engaging in these activities can aid in hastening your recuperation. Having the operation is already the culmination of your hard work. To get the greatest outcomes possible, it’s crucial to do these last tasks.

Stop right away if any of the above actions make you uncomfortable or if you have any further queries. If you feel pain or discomfort while performing these exercises, speak with your eye doctor before continuing. Depending on your medical background and present state of vision, your eye doctor can recommend a different set of exercises for you to perform after your cataract removal.

How Can We Help

You can count on Skipper Eye-Q Super Speciality Eye Hospital to support you at every step of the process, from preoperative consultations to actual cataract treatment and beyond. Our cataract surgery experts provide the greatest care possible in terms of fostering a caring, supporting atmosphere and attending to your overall health and well-being.

When it comes to returning to your regular activities, heed the advice of your physician. A prescription from your doctor for eye drops and anti-infection drugs will be given to you. Additionally, our staff will educate you on things to avoid while recovering. We can promptly assess any potential surgical problems at every follow-up visit. If you still require spectacles or contact lenses, don’t forget to take benefit of our other offerings.

Our goal at Skipper Eye-Q Super Speciality Eye Hospital is to work with you to have the greatest eyesight possible following refractive cataract surgery. Together, we can choose the best care and treatments to help you see better.

Get in touch with us right now to arrange a consultation or to find out more about training eyes after cataract surgery. Our compassionate eye specialists will support you both during and after your cataract-removal surgery.

Share it:
Our Doctors
Testimonials

Oluremi Ashaolu

Hello everyone at skipper Eye q Skipper eye q is a place to be, they’re so kind and understanding especially the receptionist she was so helpful when I came for my son’s test and operation, God bless you all

Rossy Jolaoluwa

Great hospital my surgery was successful I have been discharged. All thanks to skipper and My lovely and beautiful Dr Okunade. I’m really happy

Joy Makanjuola

I did my surgery last year at the ilupeju branch, at first I was scared at first but after the surgery I didn’t regret it. Thank you Dr Okunade,very excellent Doctor.

April 15, 2024
Difference Between Open And Closed Angle Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a medical word for a collection of eye disorders involving damage to the optic nerve. The brain receives visual information through the optic nerve and in case of glaucoma, the information is disrupted. As a result, glaucoma causes vision loss and alterations in vision. Avoid letting glaucoma impair your vision! You can rely on Skipper Eye-Q International Eye Hospitals for professional glaucoma care and treatment. To make you understand glaucoma symptoms and protect your eyesight, our committed team of eye care specialists provides individualized treatment plans, cutting-edge tests, and sophisticated surgical methods. Make an appointment right now to take charge of your eye health!

Comparing Open And Closed-Angle Glaucoma

Understanding glaucoma can be challenging due to there being many types of glaucoma. In open-angle glaucoma, the drainage angle in the eye stays open, but over time, the trabecular meshwork is obstructed, increasing the pressure inside the eye. On the other hand, acute angle-closure glaucoma is brought on by a rapid rise in ocular pressure as a result of fluid accumulation when the drainage angle narrows or shuts entirely.

Differences in Angle

The main differences between closed-angle closure glaucoma and open-angle glaucoma are the circumstances that cause them, the condition of the drainage angle in the eye, how quickly they advance, and how severe the signs of glaucoma are.

Open-angle Glaucoma

  • The drainage angle stays open.
  • Eye pressure increases slowly.
  • Often no glaucoma symptoms till the condition worsens.

Angle-closure Glaucoma

  • The drainage angle closes or narrows.
  • Eye pressure increases suddenly
  • Symptoms include headache, nausea, severe eye pain, and blurred vision.

Open-angle Glaucoma

The chronic eye disease known as open-angle glaucoma is defined by a slow accumulation of pressure inside the eye as a result of an obstruction in the trabecular meshwork, the drainage angle that controls intraocular fluid. Over time, vision loss results from damage to the optic nerve caused by this elevated pressure. Open-angle glaucoma is frequently asymptomatic in the early stages and may go undiagnosed until it causes a noticeable loss of vision. To manage this problem promptly and prevent irreparable vision loss, routine eye exams are essential.

Must Read – Holistic Treatment for Glaucoma

Open-angle Glaucoma Symptoms

Open-angle glaucoma symptoms might not appear until the condition has advanced considerably. But when the illness worsens, people might encounter:

  • Loss of peripheral vision
  • Tunnel vision
  • Blurry vision
  • Haloes around lights
  • Redness or discomfort in the eyes
  • Elevated intraocular pressure

Open-angle Glaucoma Causes

Usually, open-angle glaucoma arises from:

  • Eye’s ineffective drainage system
  • Accumulation of watery humour
  • Elevated intraocular pressure
  • Harm to the optic nerve
  • Age, race, genetics, and health issues like hypertension or diabetes.
  • A family history of glaucoma increases risk.

Diagnosis of Open-angle Glaucoma

Open-angle glaucoma is usually diagnosed with a thorough eye examination that includes testing.

  • Tonometry: Intraocular pressure is measured by tonometry.
  • Ophthalmoscopy: Looks for evidence of injury to the optic nerve.
  • Testing for visual field: Evaluates loss of peripheral vision.
  • Gonioscopy: Determines the angle of discharge.
  • Imaging tests: Provide precise pictures of the retina and optic nerve, such as OCT.

Open-angle Glaucoma Treatment

Lowering intraocular pressure is usually the goal of treatment for open-angle glaucoma to stop more visual nerve damage. This can be accomplished by:

  • Prescription eye drops to enhance drainage or decrease fluid production
  • Oral drugs to reduce ocular pressure
  • To enhance drainage, use laser treatment (trabeculoplasty).
  • Surgical techniques to establish new drainage channels, such as drainage device implantation.
  • Follow-up visits with an eye expert and regular monitoring.

Closed-angle Glaucoma

Closed angle closure glaucoma, another name for closed-angle glaucoma or narrow-angle glaucoma, is a condition in which the eye’s drainage angle narrows or gets blocked, which causes an abrupt rise in intraocular pressure. Seeking prompt medical care is necessary for closed-angle glaucoma to avoid visual loss and other consequences. Medication to lower intraocular pressure, laser therapy to widen the drainage angle, or surgery to form a new drainage channel are possible forms of treatment. For acute angle closure glaucoma to be adequately managed, regular monitoring is essential.

Must Read – What Does a Right Eye Pain and Headache Mean?

Closed-angle Glaucoma Symptoms

Closed-angle glaucoma symptoms can include

  • Sudden, excruciating eye pain
  • Headache
  • Vomiting and nausea
  • Blurry vision
  • Haloes around lights
  • Redness in the eyes
  • Visibility noticeably declining

Closed-angle Glaucoma Causes

The main cause of closed-angle glaucoma is usually a rapid rise in ocular pressure caused by the iris’s forward bulge, which obstructs the drainage angle of the eye. There are several reasons why this might occur, including:

  • Limited drainage angle within the lens
  • Ageing-related lens thickening
  • Damage or harm to the eyes
  • Some drugs that cause the pupils to dilate
  • History of narrow-angle glaucoma or closed angle closure glaucoma in the family

Closed-angle Glaucoma Diagnosis

  • Comprehensive eye examination: A thorough eye exam that measures intraocular pressure (IOP), examines the optic nerve head, and evaluates visual acuity.
  • Gonioscopy: Assesses the eye’s drainage angle to ascertain if it is open or shut.
  • OCT: Detects variations in the thickness of the retinal nerve fibre layer and the optic nerve head.
  •  Visual field test: Peripheral vision is evaluated during testing, as it may be impacted in more severe instances of acute angle closure glaucoma.
  • Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM): Offers valuable insights into the structural anomalies that underlie closed-angle glaucoma.

Closed-angle Glaucoma Treatment

The goal of treating closed-angle glaucoma is to lower intraocular pressure (IOP), manage acute episodes, and avoid vision loss.

Drugs: Medications to reduce intraocular pressure are frequently used as part of immediate therapy (IOP). These might consist of:

    • Topical eye drops
    • Oral medicines

Laser Peripheral Iridotomy (LPI): This treatment uses a laser to make a tiny hole in the iris that lets aqueous humour freely flow, alleviating angle closure.

Surgical Interventions: In extreme circumstances or when LPI and medicine don’t work, surgical techniques such

    • Trabeculectomy: To lower IOP, a trabeculectomy involves opening a new drainage channel.
    • Goniotomy: Improving aqueous outflow by opening the obstructed angle.

Continuous Monitoring: Scheduling routine check-ups with an ophthalmologist to keep an eye on IOP, evaluate the efficacy of therapy, and make any modifications.

Must Read – How to Cure Apollo Eye Disease

FAQ

What is the difference between open-angle glaucoma and angle-closure glaucoma?

In open-angle glaucoma, the drainage angle in the eye stays open, but over time, the trabecular meshwork is obstructed, increasing the pressure inside the eye. On the other hand, angle-closure glaucoma is brought on by a rapid rise in ocular pressure as a result of fluid accumulation when the drainage angle narrows or shuts entirely.

What are angles in glaucoma?

The drainage angles in the eye where the cornea and iris converge are called the angles in glaucoma. The fluid that nourishes the eye, known as aqueous humour, is largely regulated by these angles.

How To Treat Closed-Angle Glaucoma?

Medications to lower intraocular pressure and surgeries like laser peripheral iridotomy or other treatments to enhance drainage and stop further angle closure are commonly used in the treatment of closed-angle glaucoma.

How To Treat Open-Angle Glaucoma?

Eye drops, oral drugs, or surgical procedures are frequently used to treat open-angle glaucoma to reduce intraocular pressure and avoid optic nerve damage. According to the extent of the illness and the patient’s reaction to therapy, several treatment approaches may be recommended.

Do you have glaucoma symptoms such as discomfort in your eyes or hazy vision? Take action right now! Make an appointment with Skipper Eye-Q International Eye Hospitals for a thorough eye examination. To ensure the best possible eye health, our skilled ophthalmologists specialize in glaucoma treatment options and early diagnosis. Make an appointment now to start down the path to better eyesight!

Share it:
Our Doctors
Testimonials

Oluremi Ashaolu

Hello everyone at skipper Eye q Skipper eye q is a place to be, they’re so kind and understanding especially the receptionist she was so helpful when I came for my son’s test and operation, God bless you all

Rossy Jolaoluwa

Great hospital my surgery was successful I have been discharged. All thanks to skipper and My lovely and beautiful Dr Okunade. I’m really happy

Joy Makanjuola

I did my surgery last year at the ilupeju branch, at first I was scared at first but after the surgery I didn’t regret it. Thank you Dr Okunade,very excellent Doctor.

January 29, 2024

Apollo eye infections can cause discomfort, pain, and irritation. These infections may progress to more severe issues if overlooked for an extended period. Typically, eye infections arise when harmful microorganisms such as viruses, bacteria, or fungi invade any part of the eye or its neighboring tissues.
Common indicators of Apollo eye infections encompass:

  • Red eyes
  • Severe pain
  • Excessive tearing
  • Eye discharge
  • Light sensitivity
  • Swelling of the eyes
  • Puffy eyelids
  • Itchiness
  • Blurred vision

While certain home remedies can help alleviate symptoms of eye infections, it is advisable to consult a doctor for a thorough examination. Some infections may pose a severe risk, and professional medical advice is essential for proper diagnosis and eye treatment.

Read More – How to Prevent Apollo Eye Infection

8 Effective Home Remedies For Apollo Eye Infection

1- Saltwater Solution
Saline, or saltwater, is a tried-and-true natural remedy for treating eye infections. This solution aids in clearing away pus, dirt, or discharge, mimicking the eye’s natural cleansing mechanism. Additionally, saltwater’s robust antimicrobial properties contribute to the effective treatment of apollo eye infections.

Mix one teaspoon of salt in half a liter of cooled boiled water to prepare. Dip a cotton swab, gently wipe your eyes from the inner corner towards your nose, and discard the swab. Repeat this process several times until the eye irritation subsides.

2- Warm Compress
A warm compress soothes infected, irritated, and sore eyes. Research has indicated its efficacy as a home remedy for conditions like blepharitis and the relief of dry eyes.

Soak a cloth in warm water and gently apply it to your eye for 2-3 minutes. Repeat this process several times a day to alleviate eye irritation. Always use a clean cloth to avoid burns and ensure the water is not excessively hot.

3- Cold Compress
Cold compresses are valuable for reducing inflammation and swelling in eye infections and injuries. They can relieve the discomfort associated with certain eye problems, although they may not fully treat eye infections.

Soak a clean cloth in ice water and gently apply it to the eyes. Avoid exerting excessive pressure on the eye or placing ice directly on the eye or eyelid.

4- Honey
Honey is a longstanding remedy that effectively treats eye infections such as blepharitis, keratitis, and keratoconjunctivitis. Its potent anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial qualities can relieve eye infections.

  • Boil a cup of water, add two drops of honey, stir well, and allow it to cool.
  • Using a sterilized dropper, apply a drop in each eye.
  • Rinse after 5-10 minutes and repeat this process twice daily for optimal results.

Read More – How to Cure Apollo Eye Disease

5- Castor Oil
Castor oil’s ricinoleic acid has anti-inflammatory properties that reduce eye swelling. Additionally, the oil lubricates the eyes, easing any associated irritation.

Apply castor oil around the eyes, then soak a cloth in warm water and place it over the eyelids. Allow it to remain for 10 minutes.

Repeat this process twice daily.

6- Colostrum
For mild eye infections in newborns, colostrum in breast milk can remarkably effectively alleviate symptoms associated with neonatal eye conditions like conjunctivitis. Abundant antibodies present in breast milk aid in combating infections and curing conjunctivitis in newborns.

Gently administer one to two drops of breast milk into the eyes of a newborn using a dropper. After 5 minutes, clean the eyes. Repeat this process twice a day for best results.

7- Green Tea Bags
Harnessing green tea bags’ potent anti-inflammatory and soothing properties effectively alleviates inflammation and reduces eye swelling. Place cooled tea bags on your eyes for optimal results, promoting stress relief and relaxation.

8- Essential Oils
Certain essential oils, such as peppermint, tea tree, and rosemary, possess potent antimicrobial properties capable of combating microorganisms responsible for eye infections.

To benefit from these essential oils, add a few drops of tea tree or rosemary essential oils to boiling water. Cover yourself with a towel, inhale the vapor for 5 minutes, and experience infection relief.

Prevention Tips

To avert eye infections, consistently employ the following preventive measures:

  • Avoid direct contact with your eyes.
  • Frequently wash your hands, especially after touching contaminated surfaces.
  • If you wear contact lenses, ensure proper cleaning and storage.
  • Refrain from sharing eye makeup or makeup brushes with others.

When to Consult a Doctor

At times, seeking medical attention for eye infection is necessary, contingent upon the type and severity of the condition. Visit your eye care clinic if:

  • You experience pain or encounter difficulty in vision.
  • You develop sensitivity to light.
  • Your symptoms persist for a week or more, or if they are worsening.
  • There is a significant discharge of pus or mucus from your eye.
  • You exhibit additional signs of infection, such as fever or body aches.

Apollo eye infection often leads to school absences and has the potential to spread rapidly in educational settings. Educating children on preventive measures is crucial to avoid contracting pink eye and other infections.

Read More – How Long Does Apollo Eye Infection Last

The Bottom Line

While numerous home remedies may relieve symptoms of eye infections, it is essential to consult a doctor for proper diagnosis and eye treatment. Seeking medical assistance is crucial if you suspect your child has an eye infection.

Share it:
Our Doctors
Testimonials

Oluremi Ashaolu

Hello everyone at skipper Eye q Skipper eye q is a place to be, they’re so kind and understanding especially the receptionist she was so helpful when I came for my son’s test and operation, God bless you all

Rossy Jolaoluwa

Great hospital my surgery was successful I have been discharged. All thanks to skipper and My lovely and beautiful Dr Okunade. I’m really happy

Joy Makanjuola

I did my surgery last year at the ilupeju branch, at first I was scared at first but after the surgery I didn’t regret it. Thank you Dr Okunade,very excellent Doctor.